To have somebody do something

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To have somebody do something

To have + somebody + do something (infinitive without to) means ‘to convince somebody to do something’ or ‘to arrange for somebody to do something’:
Bruno had Icarus check last year's figures. Bruno told Icarus to check last year’s figures, and Icarus did so.
They would have Icarus do all the work himself, if they could. They would let Icarus do all the work himself, if they could.
I have the gardener take care of everything. The gardener takes care of everything, at my request.
Horatio had the test monkeys drive him around the city. Horatio arranged for the test monkeys to drive him around the city.
'To have someone do something' can also be expressed by the construction: to have + something (object) + done (past participle) by somebody:
She had her tickets booked by the agency. She got the agency to book her tickets.
I had everything taken care of by the gardener. The gardener took care of everything, at my request.
The agent ('by somebody') is often implied rather than expressed:
Did you have your hair cut (by the barber)? Did you get your hair cut (by the barber)?

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